Mamon

Mamon

You might start noticing a lot of Goldilocks mentioned in this blog that is because it is one of the most iconic family bakeshops and restaurants that people with the same age group as me grew up with in the Philippines, this restaurant also had popularized a lot of Filipino food items such as savoury dishes, desserts, cakes and pastries like this post “Mamon”. I remember during the 80’s when McDonalds and other Fast Food restaurants was not yet existing or popular in the Philippines this and Aristocrat was the restaurant to go to in any type of occasion. Most of us also grew up with its baked goods such as birthday cakes, roll cakes, brazo de mercedes, mamon, polvoron and many more as these were the items our moms put on our lunchboxes.  This was also and mainstay brand in birthdays and occasions that have cakes as most of it can only be purchased at Goldilocks during that time, there no good competitors around. Now 30 years later Goldilocks became the standard of Filipino baked goods and delicacies it even went international that’s why when we visited L.A. 2 years ago dining in at Goldilocks Cerritos was a part of out itinerary as we don’t have it here in New Zealand.  Filipino shops all over the world even import these baked goods in the country they are in, I had seen that at least in Malaysia (Kota Raya), Singapore (Lucky Plaza), Hong Kong (World Wide House) and even here in Auckland.

Mamon for those who does not know is a very soft yellow sponge cake with a moist buttery top and grated cheese toppings, it’s one of the all time favourite baked goods in the Philippines, can be consumed freshly baked or straight from the fridge. It’s a very simple baked bread which definitely everybody would love, so if you want to try this one out either find a Goldilocks branch near you or try this recipe out.

Ingredients

8 eggs (whites and yolks separated)
1 1/4 cup sugar
1/3 cup water
1 tbsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1 3/4 cups flour, sifted
1/3 cup butter, melted
1/3 tsp orange extract
1/4 tsp lemon extract
1 tsp cream of tartar
grated cheddar cheese

Method

  1. Using and mixer beat together egg yolks, 1/2 cup sugar and 1/3 cup water at high speed.
  2. Once evenly mixed add baking powder, salt, flour, melted butter, orange extract and lemon extract using low speed.  Set aside.
  3. In a separate bowl combine egg whites and cream of tartar then beat at high speed. Gradually add the remaining sugar a spoonful at a time and continue beating until stiff.
  4. Fold in the yolk mixture into the egg white mixture.
  5. Place in muffin pans lined with muffin cups, pour until 3/4 full.  Then bake on a preheated oven at 180C for 15 minutes.
  6. Once cooked generously brush mamon with melted butter on top this makes the top sticky when it sets, then add grated cheese.

20 Responses

  1. These mamon must be wonderfully soft and light and I love the idea of brushing them with melted butter when they come out of the oven – yummy. The addition of grated cheese on top is new to me – I usually top mine with frosting or caramel.
    :-) Mandy

  2. Lot of eggs, would be very light and delicate. Using cheese is an interesting twist to the regular cupcakes

  3. Lovely dessert Raymund, anything will cheese for sure I will drool.

  4. Kim says:

    Looks delicious!

  5. crustabakes says:

    i thought grated cheese on desserts was only popular in indonesia. I guess it is well accepted in the phillippinnes as well!

  6. Meri says:

    That surprised me with the cheese, but sounds very tasty! I wish I could go to Goldilocks!

  7. saminacooks says:

    MMM that cupcake sound delicious. Grated cheese part…well as I recently found out from crustabakes :) is new to me. But sweet and salty always goes well together..so this one is definitely one I am bookmarking to try

  8. Rita says:

    As I don’t think I can find a Goldilock branch near me, these mamons are really worth trying!! :P

  9. I love how delicious this cupcake recipe sounds. When it comes to certain sweets, I’m front and center and I can’t wait to try Mamons. Love the grated cheese with this as well, makes for a great surprise to every bite

  10. tagadavaoko says:

    wow my mom will love ur site! thanks for sharing ur recipes :)

  11. These are right up my alley. I love the cheese on top…I thought it was coconut, but this is more intriguing to me since I haven’t eaten a muffin like this before. Cerritos isn’t very far from me…maybe I need to take a trip to Goldilocks. :

  12. Christin@purplebirdblog says:

    Sounds fabulous!! :)

  13. mi. says:

    this looks yum! I’ve always wanted to know how to make this!

  14. Bicolano ako says:

    I love Mamon :) …. Never tried it with cheese before….will try….I tried Ensaymada with cheese and coconut from Goldilocks…to die for! Wow! Awesome pinoy foods :)

  15. nora guan lopez says:

    yummy. . . .i like mamon . . .

  16. minirissa says:

    hi just want to make sure of making crema de fruta and followed your recipe for mamon. but it says there for bake for 180 for 15mins but the problem is 15mins is not enough still not yet cooked. i know for mamon is divided into muffin pan but how about the whole how long is thr baking .. it was not clear for crema de fruta recipe. it was simply say follow mamon procedure for the sponge cake. pls need your reply thank you

    • rsmacaalay says:

      180C for 15 minutes should be OK if its still wet add 5 to 10 more minutes to the cooking time or until toothpick comes out clean
      9 in pans also will have a thinner base compared to the ones on muffin pans so it will cook through.
      Apologies for not clarifying.

  1. October 27, 2011

    […] Pan de coco which means “coconut bread” in Spanish is a popular bread in the Philippines and Honduras. Though two versions are named similarly they are made differently to each other, the Philippine variant is a sweet bread with a sweetened grated coconut filling served as a dessert or a snack item while the Honduran version coconut meat and milk is integrated with the dough and served with stews. History states that the Honduran version is the older variant which means that the Philippine recipe originated from the Central American counterpart which was brought over by the Spanish to the Philippines during the 1600′s, the recipe then evolved to suit the local taste. Now this bread is one of the popular bakery items in the Philippines which you can buy anywhere alongside with pandesal, Spanish bread, ensaymada and mamon. […]

  2. March 21, 2012

    […] I used the same ingredients as the mamon […]

  3. April 30, 2012

    […] Mamon – a cross between mamon and puto, it’s light and […]

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