Lumpiang Togue


Lumpiang Togue 2

There are a lot of different variations of the Lumpia (spring roll) in the Philippines and sometimes it is hard to distinguish each due to the similar looking wrap in all of them, unless you ask, sometimes it’s impossible to guess what’s inside but I will give you an idea on how to identify them by describing each of the popular variants.

  1. Lumpiang Togue – Large sized spring rolls filled with mixed vegetables, main ingredient is bean sprouts, usually served with vinegar. Just by looking there is no way to distinguish this one from Lumpiang Gulay.
  2. Lumpiang Gulay – Large sized spring rolls filled with mixed vegetables, no bean sprouts, usually served with vinegar. Just by looking there is no way to distinguish this one from Lumpiang Togue.
  3. Turon – Medium to large sized spring rolls filled with saba banana, brown sugar and sometimes jack fruit, you can distinguish it by its sweet smell and caramelized sugar that clings to the crispy pastry.
  4. Lumpiang Shanghai – Small to medium sized spring rolls filled with minced pork. Other ingredients can also be used such as carrots, shrimps and onions to name some. Usually served with catsup and/or sweet chilli sauce. Just by looking there is no way to distinguish this one from Lumpiang Isda, they smell different though.
  5. Lumpiang Isda – Small to medium sized spring rolls filled with fish meat. Usually served with catsup and/or sweet chilli sauce. Just by looking there is no way to distinguish this one from Lumpiang Shanghai, they smell different though.
  6. Cheese Sticks – Small and thin sized spring rolls filled with cheese, usually served with pink dip made out of mayonnaise and catsup.
  7. Lumpiang Ubod – Not deep fried but more crepe like, main ingredient is ubod (coconut heart), minced meat, peanuts, lettuce leaf and jicama, served with peanut sauce. Just by looking it is hard to distinguish this one from Lumpiang Sariwa unless it is served with the wrap opened.
  8. Lumpiang Sariwa – Not deep fried but more crepe like, filled with vegetables like bamboo shoots, carrots, shrimps and cabbage. Served with peanut sauce. Just by looking it is hard to distinguish this one from Lumpiang Ubod unless it is served with the wrap opened.
  9. Lumpiang Hubad – Lumpiang Sariwa or Lumpiang Ubod without the wrapper usually served with peanut sauce.

I had made most of them and if you’re interested in the recipe or just finding out in detail what they contain just click on the links above. For today we will be making the Lumpiang Togue (Bean Sprout Spring Roll), another popular street food and afternoon snack served with spicy vinegar. For those who haven’t tried this one, consuming it is a bit different compared to the other lumpia. Usually this is eaten with hands and first thing you do is to bite the top so it opens the cavity so that you can pour the spicy vinegar inside, eat them vertically so the vinegar does not drip out. Usually the last bite is the best because that the most sour part of this dish as the vinegar had accumulated in that bottom part.

Ingredients (Lumpiang Togue)

2 cups bean sprouts
1/4 head cabbage, shredded
1 large carrots, thinly sliced
1 cup green beans, thinly sliced
1/2 cup minced shrimps
2 tbsp sesame oil
2 tbsp oyster sauce
2 tsp sugar
salt
Lumpia wrapper

Ingredients (Vinegar Dip)

1 1/2 cup vinegar
4 red chillies, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tsp freshly ground black pepper
1 small onion, chopped
3 tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp salt

Method

1. Combine all Lumpiang Togue ingredient together except for the wrapper.
2. Heat up a wok filled with oil for deep frying.
3. Prepare one piece of lumpia wrapper, lay it with one edge pointing to your direction, place three tablespoons of the vegetable mix in the bottom part of the wrapper near the edge. Now start rolling and when it reaches third of the way fold the left and right edges to keep the contents from going outside the sides. Continue to roll until the top edge, dampen the top edge to seal.
4. Deep fry immediately, do not set aside as the liquid content might make the wrapper soggy. Now continue with the remaining ingredients and make sure once you finish wrapping one cook it immediately.
5. Once cooked, remove from oil then place in a paper towel lined plate to remove excess oil.
6. Mix all vinegar dip ingredients together.
7. Serve hot together with vinegar dip.

Lumpiang Togue Wide

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18 thoughts on “Lumpiang Togue

  1. Is that what you call it? I always make lumpiang shanghai and pansit for parties and celebrations. Or whenever there’s some excuse to celebrate. Used to make my own wrappers using Swans Down flour and water “painted” on a hot cast iron skillet!

      • It’s really not that hard. Just time-consuming. What was I back then? 10 years old??? My mom and all her friends and relatives made their own lumpia wrappers. One of them made about 300 wrappers in an hour. She threw plenty of parties, and I think 300 was the record that no one could beat. It was all about painting (we actually used brushes for latex paint) the Swans Down/water really thin on a hot, greased skillet. Paint it too thick–you’ll break the wrapper when you roll.

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